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Posts for category: OBGYN

By J. Gabriel Guajardo, M.D.
June 12, 2020
Category: OBGYN
Birth control is important if you’re a sexually active female. It keeps you safe from pregnancy while also providing other health benefits. Just like there are many different types of people, there are a variety of birth control options. It’s important to talk to your OBGYN to discover what works best for you. There is a birth control type that matches every female's preferences and lifestyle. 
 
Long-Acting Reversible Contraceptives 
These are long-term birth control options that are inserted into your body. They can last anywhere between three-to-ten years without needing a replacement. Your OBGYN will insert the device during a scheduled appointment. These are great if you don’t want to worry about taking or applying your birth control daily. 
 
An intrauterine device (IUD) is a small, plastic T-shaped device inserted into the uterus. They are one of the most effective types of birth control. They are instantly reversible by having your OBGYN remove the IUD when you are thinking about conceiving. IUDs work by either releasing the hormone progestin, which thickens cervical mucus to keep sperm away or through copper, which functions as a spermicide. 
 
An implant is a thin rod that your OBGYN places into your arm. Just like with an IUD, this method is extremely effective. Once removed, a female can conceive right away. Implants last for years and work by producing progestin. It’s the same as a hormone IUD, with progestin thickening cervical mucus to stop sperm from reaching the egg. 
 
Short-Acting Hormonal Methods
This category contains birth control pills, the patch, the shot, and the vaginal ring. These differ from the long-acting type by needing to be used or replaced on a daily or monthly basis. 
 
Birth control pills are one of the most popular forms of contraceptives. Your OBGYN prescribes them for you. They are an affordable and easy option. You take the pill every day just like any other type of medication. For the best results, take it at the same time every day as well. 
 
The vaginal ring, called the NuvaRing, is a bendable ring placed in the vagina. Talk to your OBGYN about NuvaRing, as you need a prescription for it. This birth control method works by being inserted into your vagina. It stays there for twenty-one days before removal. You can either keep the ring out for a week during your period or replace it with the next one immediately after.
 
The birth control shot is also called Depo-Provera. This is an injectable form of birth control performed every three months. It is a very straightforward process. Every three months you go into your OBGYN office to receive a shot, which prevents fertility until the next dosage. It’s a great option for people who want something low maintenance and without daily interaction. 
 
The birth control patch is a weekly contraceptive. You put on a new patch every week for three weeks, leaving it off the fourth week while you’re menstruating. The patch is similar to a bandage and is commonly placed on the stomach, back, upper arm, or buttock. Talk to your OBGYN if this option is right for you. It is less effective for patients weighing over two-hundred pounds.  
By J. Gabriel Guajardo, M.D.
May 15, 2020
Category: OBGYN
Tags: Colposcopy  
ColposcopyA colposcopy is an OBGYN procedure performed after abnormal test results for cervical cancer or unusual areas are detected on the vulva, vagina, or cervix. Pap smear results come back flagged if there’s a chance the cervix is infected with human papillomavirus (HPV). The entire exam takes between 5-15 minutes. The only difference between colposcopy and a Pap smear is that your OBGYN uses an instrument called a colposcope. Your OBGYN will walk you through the entire procedure. 
 
Why You Might Need a Colposcopy
 
Your OBGYN has reason to believe there is something wrong with your cervix. As mentioned, irregular pap smear results require a colposcopy. If you have already tested positive for HPV, it’s also necessary. Your OBGYN might also have noticed something unusual with your cervix during a pelvic exam. 
 
The results from your colposcopy can diagnose: 
  • Genital warts
  • Precancerous changes to the vagina, vulva, or cervix
  • Vulvar, cervical, or vaginal cancer
  • Cervicitis
What to Expect During the Procedure
 
This is a nonsurgical procedure your OBGYN will perform in their office. You’ll undress from the waist down and put on a medical gown. The doctor will have you lie down on the exam table and place your feet in the stirrups. Next, they use a speculum to open your vagina. This opens up the walls so the cervix is more visible. 
 
Because the procedure is somewhat uncomfortable, numbing medication or certain types of sedation are used. Once you are feeling comfortable, the next step is to clean the cervix. This gives your OBGYN a better view. The colposcope can now be used. This is a magnifying instrument placed right outside the vulva. A light shines through it and brightens the cervix. All the unusual areas on the cervix are made completely clear. A biopsy is then taken of these abnormal cells for further testing. 
 
After everything is done, expect some mild discomfort. It’s similar to having a slight period cramp. In the next few days, you’ll experience spotting, bleeding, or dark discharge. 
 
Before Your Appointment
 
You’re going to want to make sure that your appointment doesn’t take place during your period. This makes it much easier for your OBGYN to perform the colposcopy. For at least twenty-four hours before your appointment, avoid using creams like medicine, douches, tampons, and engaging in vaginal sex.
 
Make sure to let your doctor know beforehand if you’re pregnant or on any blood thinner medication. 
By J. Gabriel Guajardo, M.D.
February 27, 2020
Category: OBGYN

Did you know that cervical cancer is the fourth most common cancer for women worldwide? While this statistic can be startling the good news is that it is one of the most preventable cancers. A cervical cancer screening is one of the best and most reliable tools our OBGYN has to detect cancerous and precancerous cells within the cervix. This screening is most often referred to as a Pap test.

What is a Pap test?

Women as young as 21 years old should start getting routine cervical cancer screenings from their OBGYN. If results from the first Pap smear are normal then women between the ages of 21 to 29 will only need to get a Pap test every three years. Women with an abnormal Pap will require a repeat Pap test to look for the presence of precancerous cells.

Women between the ages of 30 to 65 should get a cervical cancer screening every 5 years. Once a woman reaches 65 years old, she usually won’t need to undergo cervical cancer screenings any longer. Women at high risk for cervical cancer may need to come in more often for screenings. This is something that you can discuss with your gynecologist during your first screening or next annual wellness exam.

Are there other ways to prevent cervical cancer?

Along with getting routine cervical cancer screenings your OBGYN can also provide a way to protect young women from contracting HPV, a common STI that is also the leading cause of cervical cancer. The HPV vaccine is often recommended for young women around the age of 11 or 12.

This vaccine can be administered to women between the ages of 13 and 26 who have not contracted HPV. The vaccine comes in three doses and it protects against the strains of HPV that are most likely to cause cervical cancer. Even if women have received the HPV vaccine they should still come in for routine screenings and checkups.

Whether you want to learn more about the HPV vaccine or you need to schedule your annual checkup and Pap smear, turn to your OBGYN today to take an active interest in your reproductive health.

By J. Gabriel Guajardo, M.D.
February 21, 2020
Category: OBGYN
Tags: Menopause  

The Office on Women’s Health states that, on average, menopause starts at age 52. All throughout menopause, your progesterone and estrogen levels will fluctuate while your ovaries struggle to maintain your normal production of hormones. It’s this fluctuation that causes the most common menopause symptoms such as hot flashes, sleep issues, mood swings, difficulty concentrating, and bone loss. Here at the office of gynecologist Dr. J. Gabriel Guajardo in Brownsville, TX, we can help you figure out the most suitable treatments for managing these menopause symptoms. These treatments can include a combination of the following.

Hot Flashes

Certain plant-derived hormones or phytoestrogens, found commonly in soy-based food items, could partially reverse some hormonal changes resulting from menopause. Other supplements that contain phytoestrogens include wild yam, black cohosh, licorice, dong quai, and red clover. However, it’s immensely vital to note that these supplements could interfere with certain medications so you need to speak with your gynecologist in Brownsville, TX, before taking any of these supplements.

Regular exercise, at least 20 minutes three times weekly, could likewise relieve hot flashes by reducing the amount of LH or luteinizing hormone and FSH or follicle-stimulating hormone. It’s also best to avoid triggers such as alcohol, spicy foods, and hot beverages. You should also drink plenty of water and dress in layers that you could easily take off when you become too hot.

Vaginal Dryness

This could greatly affect your sex life. You can try OTC lubricants like KY Jelly before having intercourse or Replens that should be applied daily. You can likewise talk to your doctor about vaginal estrogen rings and vaginal estrogen creams that provide low estrogen doses inside the vagina.

Mood Shifts

Hormonal changes could significantly impact your mood. You could try exercising every day, doing yoga, practicing meditation, avoiding alcohol, restricting your caffeine intake, and eating more veggies and fruits to help boost your mood and overall health. If these strategies fail, you might need therapy and medication.

Urinary Incontinence

Doing Kegel exercises could help make your pelvic floor muscles stronger and improve control over your urethra. You should also limit your consumption of spicy foods and caffeinated or alcoholic drinks to avoid over-stimulating your bladder. Ask your gynecologist about prescription meds for urinary incontinence as well.

A Very Crucial Note on Hormone Replacement Therapy

HRT or hormone replacement therapy basically involves medications that contain female hormones. They work by replacing hormones that your body will stop producing following menopause and are extremely effective are relieving practically all menopause symptoms. However, these meds should only be taken under the care of your gynecologist.

Need Relief from Your Menopause Symptoms?

Visit the office of Dr. J. Gabriel Guajardo, here at Brownsville, TX, or dial (956) 350-4821 to arrange an appointment with your gynecologist.

By J. Gabriel Guajardo, M.D.
February 12, 2020
Category: OBGYN
Tags: IUD  

More women in the US than ever before have an IUD, or intrauterine device. IUDs have become a popular birth control method for women because of its “set it and forget it” approach. If you’ve been hearing your girlfriend talking about how much they love their IUD it may have you thinking whether or not this is the right option for you. An OBGYN can answer all of your questions and help you make an informed decision about your family planning needs.

Here’s what you should know about getting an IUD and what to expect when you want it removed,

There are different kinds of IUDs

Your gynecologist will discuss the different options during your consultation. There are a variety of different hormonal (progestin-releasing) IUDs on the market; however, if you experience negative effects from hormonal birth control then non-hormonal birth control such as the Paragard (copper) IUD may be the best option for you.

This copper IUD will prevent pregnancy as soon as it’s placed and it can last up to 10 years. The average lifespan of a hormonal IUD is 3-5 years.

The IUD placement procedure is fast

To get an IUD your gynecologist will place a speculum into the vagina where they will then insert the IUD into the opening of your cervix where it will remain in the uterus. The simple procedure is performed right in your gynecologist’s office and it only takes a couple of minutes to place. You may be instructed to take an over-the-counter pain reliever prior to reduce cramping and a local numbing medication may also be applied to the cervix prior to the insertion.

Every woman will respond differently to getting an IUD. Some women may be able to return to work the very same day while others may need to take some time off. It’s best to err on the side of caution and maybe take the day off work so you can manage any symptoms you may have and just take it easy.

The IUD can be removed anytime

If you decide you do want to get pregnant or you no longer need birth control then you will want to discuss this with your gynecologist. The IUD removal process is simple and involves pulling the thread of the device so it collapses and slides right out. It’s important that you don’t try and remove the IUD on your own; it should always be removed by a qualified medical professional.

Have questions about getting an IUD? Want to find out whether this is the best birth control method for you? Then schedule an appointment with your gynecologist today.