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Posts for category: Pregnancy Care

By J. Gabriel Guajardo, M.D.
August 27, 2021
Category: Pregnancy Care
Gestational DiabetesEven if you’ve never been diagnosed with diabetes, some women can develop diabetes during pregnancy. This is known as gestational diabetes and is often diagnosed by the 24th week of pregnancy. Gestational diabetes means that your blood sugar levels are too high. If left untreated this can lead to serious complications for both you and your baby, so you must discuss your gestational diabetes with your OBGYN so that you and your doctor can create an effective game plan.
 
Why does gestational diabetes occur?

The pancreas is responsible for producing insulin, which helps your body store sugar from food to use for energy; however, when you are pregnant the placenta also produces hormones that can impact insulin levels and lead to insulin resistance. If your body doesn’t produce enough insulin, this can result in gestational diabetes.
 
What are the signs of gestational diabetes?

It is possible for a pregnant woman to have gestational diabetes and not even know it, which is why you should keep up with prenatal visits with your OBGYN so that they can perform the necessary testing to keep both you and your baby healthy throughout your pregnancy and delivery.
 
However, it is possible to develop symptoms (particularly if you have undiagnosed diabetes before getting pregnant). These symptoms include,
  • Blurry vision
  • Fatigue
  • Increased hunger and thirst
  • Urinating more often
Since these symptoms can also just be indicative of a healthy, normal pregnancy (aka: being hungrier than usual) these symptoms don’t necessarily mean that you have gestational diabetes. You must speak with your OBGYN about certain risk factors and keep up with your checkups so that gestational diabetes can be detected right away.
 
How is gestational diabetes treated?

Many women can improve their blood sugar levels through simple measures such as healthy eating, exercising regularly, managing stress, and monitoring their blood sugar levels. By controlling this issue now you can prevent gestational diabetes in the future, as well as the development of type 2 diabetes. Sometimes your doctor may also prescribe insulin medication to help control your blood sugar.
 
Your OBGYN’s goal is to provide you with proper care and treatment throughout your life, from general wellness checkups to post-natal and menopausal care. If you have concerns about gestational diabetes, or if you’ve been diagnosed with gestational diabetes, talk with your OBGYN about the best way to keep it under control.
By J. Gabriel Guajardo, M.D.
May 11, 2021
Category: Pregnancy Care
Pregnancy MilestonesIt might feel like those nine months are a blur of excitement, rollercoaster emotions, and planning, but each new milestone and development can be exciting for soon-to-be parents. During your pregnancy, your OBGYN will become an integral part of your pregnancy, providing you with routine exams and checkups, and making sure you and your unborn child stay healthy throughout your pregnancy and delivery. Here are just some of the top pregnancy milestones,
 
Morning Sickness

Yeah, this isn’t going to be the highlight for most women during their pregnancy but it’s certainly a milestone that you won’t forget. These waves of nausea typically occur around the sixth week and, despite the name, can pop up any time of the day or night. The good news is that the queasy stomach and vomiting should go away by about 14 weeks. Talk with your OBGYN if you’re dealing with severe morning sickness or morning sickness that lasts past the first trimester.
 
First Ultrasound

Whether you suspect that you might be pregnant, or you have already gotten a positive pregnancy test, it’s important to schedule an appointment with your OBGYN as soon as possible. The first prenatal visit will usually occur around your sixth week. The first appointment will involve a variety of tests, including blood and urine testing and a Pap smear. You may also get to see your baby for the first time with an ultrasound, depending on how far along you are. This is an unforgettable moment for parents-to-be.
 
Telling Everyone

We know just how important it is to get beyond the three-month mark! Since most miscarriages happen during the first trimester, making it to the second trimester can be a triumph. Not to mention the fact that this is also the time many couples start to share the good news. From social media announcements to telling family and friends in person, this can be an exciting time for couples.
 
First Kick

Feeling your baby kick for the first time can send your heart into a flutter. It will probably be one of the weirdest and most wonderful sensations ever. You may even see an arm or leg sticking out as the baby continues to move around and grow.
 
Your Due Date

While your OBGYN probably gave you an expected due date during your first visit, don’t hold on to that due date too much. Most women don’t have their babies right on that date. While it’s fun to countdown, remember that you may have to wait a week or two more before your baby makes its appearance.
 
The Delivery

You are about to meet your child, so it’s natural to feel a flutter of excitement and nerves as you prepare for childbirth and delivery. At this point, you and your doctor will have made a birth plan to discuss how you ideally want your delivery to go and how to manage your pain. Congratulations, momma; you did it!
 
From answering questions regarding your pregnancy to providing you with checkups and genetic testing, an OBGYN is the doctor you should turn to with regards to your pregnancy health and care.
By J. Gabriel Guajardo, M.D.
January 28, 2021
Category: Pregnancy Care
Bleeding During Your PregnancyA Google search will show you thousands upon thousands of women who are wondering whether bleeding is okay during pregnancy. We understand that bleeding can be scary, especially if you aren’t sure what’s causing it. Here’s what you should know about bleeding, including when to turn to an OBGYN.

Bleeding During Your First Trimester

Your body is going through a ton of changes, especially during the first trimester. So it shouldn’t come as much of a surprise that as many as 30 percent of women experience some sort of spotting or light bleeding during early pregnancy. Some of the causes of light bleeding or spotting include,

Implantation bleeding: After about 6 to 12 days after conception, some women experience cramping and light spotting. This is known as implantation bleeding. While some women may assume that their period is coming (since implantation bleeding usually appears a few days before a woman’s period), implantation bleeding is very light and may cause pink or brown spotting that may only last a day or two.
Cervical polyps: These (often) benign polyps are common in women and can lead to inflammation and spots of bright red blood. You may not experience any other symptoms apart from light bleeding, but your OBGYN can diagnose polyps during a pelvic exam.
Pelvic exams, intercourse, or infection: Anything that may irritate the cervix may result in bleeding. This includes infections, intercourse, or a pelvic exam. If you notice some drops of bright red blood after intercourse or a pelvic exam, don’t worry. It will go away on its own.

Bleeding During Second and Third Trimester

While light bleeding is fairly normal during the first trimester, it’s less common and more likely to be a concern if there is bleeding in the second or third trimester. If you are bleeding during your second or third trimester it’s best to talk with your OBGYN as it could be a sign of,
  • Placental abruption
  • Problems with the cervix such as an infection
  • Placenta previa
  • Premature labor
Bleeding: When to be Concerned

Since bleeding could be a sign of a miscarriage, ectopic pregnancy, or other serious problems, you must talk with your OBGYN about any bleeding you experience. You should call your doctor right away if,
  • Your bleeding lasts more than 24 hours
  • Bleeding is heavy or you pass blood clots or tissue
  • Your bleeding is accompanied by abdominal pain, fevers, or chills
If you have any concerns about symptoms or issues during pregnancy, your OBGYN can provide you with the answers and care you need. Don’t ever hesitate to call your OBGYN if you are worried about bleeding or other problems. A simple phone call can determine whether you need to come in for an evaluation.
By J. Gabriel Guajardo, M.D.
October 21, 2020
Category: Pregnancy Care
Tags: Pregnancy  

Being pregnant is both equally exciting and confusing at the same time, especially for first-time moms. Working closely with your OBGYN here at J. Gabriel Guajardo, M.D. in Brownsville, TX, Dr. J. Gabriel Guajardo and knowing what you can expect throughout your pregnancy journey will help you be more prepared for what lies ahead.

Your 1st Trimester of Pregnancy

The first couple of months of your pregnancy involve rapid changes for you and your little one. For you, these may include nausea, fatigue, and breast tenderness. You may likewise feel excited and both anxious at times. For your little one, the organs, spinal cord, heart, and brain starts to develop. Your little one’s toes and fingers may even start to take shape.

Your 2nd Trimester of Pregnancy

During the four to six months of your pregnancy, you’ll probably (of hopefully) feel much better than the first several months. It’s during these months that your little one starts to feel more real than ever. You baby might be able to hear and move at this point. By the 20th week, you’re almost halfway into your journey and you may be experiencing changes to your skin, a rapidly growing belly, and even bigger breasts.

Routine checkups with your OBGYN in Brownsville, TX, remain immensely crucial at this point in your pregnancy. If you have any concerns or questions, at all, even if you think it’s not important or just silly, don’t hesitate to relay them to Dr. Guajardo.

Your 3rd Trimester of Pregnancy

During these last couple of months, expect to undergo significant emotional and physical changes. Because of all the rapid changes that you have been going through these past months, plus the heartburn and backaches common during the third trimester, you may also feel increasingly anxious and just ready to give birth. As for your baby, she or he might be opening and closing her or his eyes and packing on the weight, causing more intense movements.

Keep in mind that you can do a lot to ensure that you have a healthy pregnancy. Depending on the exact nature of your pregnancy, you may be meeting with your OBGYN more frequently for checkups. As the big day approaches, don’t hesitate to ask questions and educating yourself.

If You Have Any Questions or Concerns About Your Pregnancy, Talk to Us

Book an appointment with your OBGYN Dr. J. Gabriel Guajardo here at J. Gabriel Guajardo, M.D. in Brownsville, TX, by dialing (956) 350-4821.

By J. Gabriel Guajardo, M.D.
October 20, 2020
Category: Pregnancy Care
PregnancyFinding out you are pregnant is one of the most exciting moments in a woman's or couples’ lives; however, finding out you’re a high-risk pregnancy can be worrisome. It’s important to understand what factors can put a pregnant woman at risk for complications. Some of these factors require simple lifestyle changes while other factors cannot be altered, but the most important factor is that you have a trusted and knowledgeable OBGYN that can ensure that you get the regular prenatal care that you need to prevent serious complications.

What can lead to a high-risk pregnancy?

There is a wide range of factors that can determine whether a woman will be a high-risk pregnancy. Some of these factors include:
  • Previous pregnancy complications (if you’ve been pregnant before and dealt with complications such as premature birth, then you are more likely to deal with complications with future pregnancies)
  • Multiple births (if you are having twins, triplets, quadruplets or more, you are also more likely to go into preterm labor)
  • Hypertension
  • Blood disorders (e.g. sickle cell disease)
  • Lupus or other autoimmune disorders
  • Depression
  • Advanced mature age (women who are age 35 or older)
  • Diabetes (both type 1 and type 2)
  • Thyroid disease
  • HIV/AIDS
Other risk factors include lifestyle habits, such as:
  • Smoking
  • Drinking alcohol
  • Illicit drug use
It’s important to make these changes to your lifestyle before getting pregnant to reduce the risk of birth defects and premature birth.

What does this mean for my care?

Women need to keep in mind that just because they are a high-risk pregnancy does not mean that they will face complications or issues. Having an OBGYN by your side is paramount to keeping both you and baby healthy and making sure that if problems do arise that they are caught and treated early.

A woman who is a high-risk pregnancy will want to visit their OBGYN more often for prenatal checkups so that their doctor can closely monitor them for any changes. Remember, keeping up with your prenatal care appointments is one surefire way to keep both you and your baby safe and healthy.

If you are a high-risk pregnancy or are concerned about being a high-risk pregnancy, it’s important to discuss this with your OBGYN right away.